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Division Street Bus Rapid Transit

Enhancing Connectivity in the Region's Busiest Corridor

Division Street helps thousands of people get to their homes, jobs, and places they need to go. There are around 50,000 cars on it every day, and Route 25 is used by almost a million people each year.

Division Street Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is scheduled to launch with the completion of the North Spokane Corridor in 2030. The new bus line will run for ten miles from downtown Spokane to Mead. 

Less Congestion

Buses make travel faster by reducing the number of cars on the road. A single bus can hold over one hundred riders. Less cars means less congestion for everyone.

Increased Access

Division Street BRT will expand and improve streets, crosswalks, and access for walking and cycling. Increased accessibility and safety helps residents and businesses.

Faster Travel

The Division BRT project will feature dedicated transit lanes. Cars can turn in these lanes, and buses also use them. Traffic can keep moving while buses stop for riders.

Introducing the Division Street BRT Project!

City Line was the Spokane region’s first BRT route. Find out how that success lays the groundwork for increasing connectivity on Division Street in this short video. 

Public Outreach

Public outreach is crucial to the Division Street BRT project because it plays a vital role in shaping the route and station locations. 

Two key areas requiring public input are the routing north of the Y and through downtown Spokane, as well as the finalization of preliminary station locations. This outreach ensures that the project meets the diverse needs of the community and garners support for its successful implementation.

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Benefits of BRT

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a public transportation system that provides faster and more reliable transit service than traditional buses. BRT includes distinct stations with enhanced passenger amenities including pay-before-you-board-technology, real-time bus arrival information, and raised platforms to make getting on and off the bus faster and easier. BRT buses arrive more frequently, so riders can just show up and go without needing to check a schedule. Zero-emission buses would help improve air quality and provide a smoother ride.

Source: Cleveland Regional Transit Authority

Faster traffic flow

Buses make travel faster by reducing the number of cars on the road. High passenger capacity means fewer buses are needed compared to cars to transport the same number of people.

Developing fast and reliable bus routes makes riding the bus more appealing, drawing more riders and improving road efficiency. Fewer cars mean less congestion.

Greater accessibility

Division Street BRT will improve streets, crosswalks, and access for walking and cycling. More options for mobility can reduce the stress associated with driving and parking hassles. They also make traveling accessible for those who cannot rely on cars to get to their destinations.

Increased accessibility and safety will improve quality of life along Division Street by fostering vibrant, walkable and bike-friendly communities.

Source: Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority

Division Line Rendering with BAT lanes

No waiting behind buses

Division Street BRT will use dedicated transit lanes called BAT (Business Access & Transit) lanes. These are special lanes designated for buses and turning vehicles. Traffic can keep moving while buses stop for passengers. Turning in and out of businesses is also safer because you have better visibility and opportunity to turn.

No more stop and go!

How do buses reduce traffic congestion?

View a brief video that explains how an increased number of buses on the road can alleviate traffic congestion and maintain smoother traffic flow

Background

Division Street was first identified in 2010 as a priority corridor for future transit investments

Timeline

Construction is expected to begin in 2027, and the BRT line will launch with the NSC

Documents

Read analyses, reports, and other documents that inform the project’s design and strategy

Project Partners

City of Spokane logo
The City of Spokane is a key partner for the coordination of infrastructure elements in the City of Spokane public right of way. All project work outside the WSDOT right of way will require approval from the City of Spokane.
Spokane County logo
The north portion of the alignment is within unincorporated Spokane County. Spokane County is a key project partner for the coordination of design, construction, operations, and community outreach for infrastructure elements.
SRTC logo
The SRTC is the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the region and a key project partner. The project is included in the Horizon 2045 Spokane Metropolitan Transportation Plan.
WSDOT logo
WSDOT will assist with decision-making, coordination, and approvals for most of the Division Street BRT alignment on US Highways 2 and 395, including traffic analysis, design standards, and environmental review.
City of Spokane logo
The City of Spokane is a key partner for the coordination of infrastructure elements in the City of Spokane public right of way. All project work outside the WSDOT right of way will require approval from the City of Spokane.
Spokane County logo
The north portion of the alignment is within unincorporated Spokane County. Spokane County is a key project partner for the coordination of design, construction, operations, and community outreach for infrastructure elements.
SRTC logo
The SRTC is the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) for the region and a key project partner. The project is included in the Horizon 2045 Spokane Metropolitan Transportation Plan.
WSDOT logo
WSDOT will assist with decision-making, coordination, and approvals for most of the Division Street BRT alignment on US Highways 2 and 395, including traffic analysis, design standards, and environmental review.

Frequently Asked Questions

Division Street is one of the busiest streets in Spokane serving as the main north-south street connecting communities between downtown up to the Y and further north.

Every day, more than 50,000 cars travel on Division Street with close to 2,500 people riding STA transit buses.

The timing of the BRT project is in alignment with the completion of the North Spokane Corridor. The Division Street BRT project will not be operational until the North Spokane Corridor is open.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) is a public transportation system that creates more reliable and efficient service than traditional buses. BRT provides all-day, two-way, reliable and frequent service at distinct station locations. Buses arrive more frequently so riders can just “show up and go” without needing to check a schedule.

The BRT will run north-south from downtown Spokane, along Division and Ruby Streets past the “Y” to Hastings Road then east near the North Spokane Corridor freeway (NSC) locations.

Business Access and Transit (BAT) lanes are shared-use lanes for right-turning vehicles and bus-through travel that help buses to move more efficiently through traffic and provide safer access to businesses.

BAT lanes allow vehicles, including deliveries, to turn into and out of driveways.

Lanes are not being removed on the majority of the corridor, but converted into BAT lanes. One lane of Ruby Street through the couplet will be converted into two-way protected bicycle lanes and improved pedestrian facilities.

These conversions will promote active transportation and improve the efficiency of transit

BAT lanes enhance the capacity of traffic lanes by removing buses from the public travel lanes. Vehicles don’t get stuck behind the bus as it travels down Division. Turning into businesses is safer because you have better visibility and opportunity to turn.

Traffic flow is not expected to be impacted due to decreased traffic volumes that are expected to be diverted to NSC corridor. In fact, travel times may improve as traffic is not held up by stopping buses or cars making right hand turns.

Contact

Project Manager: Don Skillingstad
Email: [email protected]

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